The Top Predictor Of Job Success

“He sounds like he knows what he’s talking about.” “I’m not sure what she said, but she sounds smart.” Whether watching candidates debate, listening to a sales presentation, or reading persuasive articles, we have all seen situations where the person who can express him or herself eloquently and precisely is given greater credibility. The business world spends a considerable sum each year to put executives through “vocabulary boot camp.”  Here’s why – studies show:

  • Attorneys with superior lexicons win more cases because they can effectively persuade.
  • Leaders in sales say vocabulary is essential to their ability to sway potential clients.
  • Graduate students with superior vocabularies were better able to present and defend their research.
Johnson O’Conner Research Laboratory conducted numerous studies showing how word knowledge impacts employment.  That research shows people with superior vocabularies:
  • Have higher IQs
  • Command greater respect
  • Read faster and comprehend more
  • Are considered more intelligent
  • Interview better
  • Are promoted faster and more often
  • Make more money
Who wouldn’t want these traits? After studying 39 manufacturing companies, Johnson O’Conner additionally found vocabulary was the single best predictor of an employee’s position with the company.  Results on a vocabulary test were more effective in predicting who was an executive, manager, foreman, or floor boss than other factors such as level of education.  We can argue that this is a chicken-or-egg situation, but either way, vocabulary is influential. I don’t know about you, but after all this, I think I might want to brush up on a little extra vocabulary! For more information on the My Vocabulary Success Coach weekly email lessons, click here. or visit:  http://collegeprepllc.com/myvocabularysuccesscoach/  ]]>

Comment

  • I would have to agree with your letter. To me a word fitly spoken
    tells me the person is well-read, knowledgeable and is willing to learn.
    However, your vocabulary should be contingent on your audience.

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