, , , ,

SAT Scores & Automatic Admissions

Many statue universities have a method for automatically admitting top students from their state. Automatic admission means that once a student has submitted an application meeting the criteria he or she will be accepted with no further review. Apply on time; meet the requirements and you are in!

I live in Texas where students who graduate in the top 10% of their high school class are automatically admitted to state universities except UT Austin, which will automatically accept graduates from the top 9% this year.

Most students and parents in Texas are aware of this policy, but many are unaware of automatic admission policies for students who are not in the top 10%. Many schools will automatically admit students based on class rank and SAT scores.

With good SAT scores, even the student who graduates last in his class can gain automatic admission. This makes preparing for the SAT more important than ever.

The chart below lists the rank and SAT requirements for five state universities. SAT scores are combined reading and math only.

Automatic Admission Requirements

 

UH

Texas Tech

Texas State

SFA

Sam Houston

Top 15% Admit
Top 11 – 25% 1000+ SAT 1140+ SAT 920+ SAT Admit 850+ SAT
Top 26-50% 1100+ SAT 1230+ SAT 1010+ SAT 850+ SAT 930+ SAT
Top 51-75% Review 1270+ SAT 1180+ SAT 1050+ SAT 1030+ SAT
Top 76-100% Review Review 1270+ SAT 1250+ SAT 1140+ SAT

Whether you live in Texas or not, you should understand that state universities place considerable weight on a student’s class rank (reflecting classes taken and grades earned) and standardized test scores. By improving SAT scores only a few points, some students can change a denial to an acceptance.

,

Follow the Application

Ever wondered what happens to a college application after it is submitted online?  Here is a video from Smith College showing what happens to an application once it is received in the admissions office.  See how they discuss academic abilities, grades, recommendations, and activities.  Admittedly, this is a simplified view, but it gives you a glimpse of what happens in a small admissions office at a selective private college.